Polythene ban will be strictly enforced: CEA

Published : 9:01 am  September 2, 2017 | No comments so far |  |  (312) reads | 

By Nabeela Hussain  

The Central Environmental Authority (CEA) will strictly enforce the polythene ban which came into force yesterday, Director of the Authority Ajith Weerawardena said.   


The ban which was enforced after the tragedy in Meethotamulla in April, will see perpetrators being fined a sum not less than Rs. 10,000 or face a jail term of two years.  


The gazette which was published yesterday bans the use, sale and manufacture of the polythene products of 20 microns or less. It also bans the manufacture of food containers, plates, cups and spoons made out of expanded polystyrene.

  
Additionally, the sale, offer for sale, free of charge offer, exhibition and use of food containers, plates, cups and spoons manufactured from expanded polystyrene has been banned in the country as of yesterday.   

 

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Speaking to the Daily Mirror, Director of the Western Province Solid Waste Management Authority Nalin Mannapperuma said the effects of the ban on garbage collected in the Province could not be gauged in the long term.   


“We will see a slight decrease and changes in the amount and type of garbage that is collected, however we cannot gauge the long-term effect of this on the amount of garbage collected,” he said.

  
Even though recycling polythene more than 20 microns would be somewhat of a blessing to officials, the effects of the new law that was implemented 

 

We will see a slight decrease and changes in the amount and type of garbage that is collected, however we cannot gauge the long-term effect of this on the amount of garbage collected

 

for the first time is yet to be seen. “This is something that has not been tried out across the world. Many countries have limited the use of polythene, not banned it completely,” Mannapperuma said.   


Meanwhile it was reported that Kenya too had banned the use, sale and manufacture of polythene in a bid to answer its own garbage woes. International media reported that those found with polythene could face fines of up to USD 38,000 or a four year jail term.  


The media also reported that Kenyan courts had rejected a challenge on the ban. Several other countries such as Rwanda, Mauritania and Eritrea have outlawed plastic bags. However, Kenya’s ban is seen as one of the toughest in the world.   


 An estimated 24 million polythene bags are used in Kenya each month.     

 

 

This is something that has not been tried out across the world. Many countries have limited the use of polythene, not banned it 
completely