Relocated residents likely to return to home turf soon

Published : 12:01 am  April 24, 2018 | No comments so far |  | 

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TATA mixed development project in Slave Island

By Nabeela Hussain   

Residents in Slave Island, relocated due to the TATA mixed development project, are most likely to be in their home turf by the end of 2018, high ranking officials at the Urban Development Authority (UDA) said.   


The seven acre land spanning Malay Street to Justice Akbar Mawatha and Java Place to Masjidul Jamiyah Mawatha was earmarked for development, forcing 521 families living in the stretch to choose between permanent relocation, compensation or rent payment for the duration of the construction of a housing complex for residents relocated due to the project.   


The project will utilize four of the seven acre stretch for commercial purposes while the rest would house a three-tower apartment complex for residents.   Speaking to the Daily Mirror, the Western Region Project Management Director Y. A. G. K Gunathilake said the first of the three residential towers was scheduled to be completed by August.   


“TATA has promised to hand over the remaining towers within two months. We hope to begin relocating residents who moved out of the area three weeks during October and hope to complete the entire process by the end of the year.”   


Gunathilake went on to say that 24 of the 521 families in the area had opted to receive compensation rather than receive an apartment in the new building.   A subsidiary of the Indian conglomerate giant, TATA Housing will begin the construction of its own commercial space in the property later this year. The company agreed to complete construction of the housing scheme for residents before commencing the construction of its own buildings.   
The project, one of many development projects in the vicinity, would change the landscape in the urban area. Residents recently petitioned against the demolition of a Victorian Era building in the vicinity, stating that the removal of the building would make the landscape in the area unrecognizable.  


UDA officials said TATA had agreed to incorporate the existing façade to the commercial spaces that would be constructed on the land.   


“The Road Development Authority (RDA) said they needed the land to widen the road. The Disaster Management Centre (DMC) also stated that the building was uninhabitable and dangerous, even though it was still used by some today,” Gunathilake explained.   


The seven acre land was leased to the Indian giant for 99 years.     


  • 521 families living in the stretch were forced to choose between permanent relocation, compensation or rent payment for the duration of the construction 
  • 24 of the 521 families in the area had opted to receive compensation rather than receive an apartment in the new building.   

 

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