If Joint Opposition demands the Opposition Leader post JO should take over power of UPFA at its Executive Committee: JVP

Published : 9:08 am  August 8, 2018 | No comments so far |  | 

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By Ajith Siriwardana and Yohan Perera

The Janatha Vimukthi Peramuna (JVP) said yesterday they had no issue of the opposition leadership being given to joint opposition if they took a collective decision and sit in the opposition as the UPFA. JVP leader Anura Kumara Dissanayke told parliament that the joint opposition was claiming the opposition leadership based on the number of MPs they have and added that the required legal and political change had not occurred despite the change in the number of MPs in its group. He said only six political parties had been accepted as official political parties in parliament when defining national government concept under the 19th Amendment to the Constituion. “MPs have been elected to parliament through six political parties. Those parties have been given an offial identity under the 19th Amendement to the Constitution. If that identity was annulled, it would lead to a constitutional crisis. If political parties did not have an identity, the government would be able to garner support of a group of opposition MPs and set up a national government,” he said.


He said if the joint opposition was claiming that they had the support of 70 MPs, what they should do is to take over the power of the UPFA at its Executive Committee meeting without being under UPFA comprising of 26 MPs. “There are former presidents, senior ministers, organisers in the joint opposition, why don’t you take over the UPFA and sit in the opposition as the SLFP. Then, it is reasonable for you to claim the opposition leadership,” he said. Mr. Dissanayake said JO MP Dinesh Gunawardane was accepted as a party leader in parliament not under the label of the joint opposition but it was a position given to the UPFA.


“Party leadership given to Nimal Siripala De Silva of the UPFA was given to Dinesh Gunawardane according to their internal agreement,” he said. He said they had initially accepted to allocate 70 per cent of the time for debates in parliament to the government whereas traditionally the opposition was allocated 60 per cent. “The tradition was to allocate time for debates as 60 per cent to the opposition and 40 per cent to the government. But we agreed to allocate 70 per cent to the government as we were a small opposition. The time of the government is allocated to joint opposition as well,” he said.

 

 If the joint opposition was claiming that they had the support of 70 MPs, what they should do is to take over the power of the UPFA at its Executive Committee meeting without being under UPFA comprising of 26 MPs.

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